Four Full-Time PhD Student Positions at Ghent University, Belgium

05.04.2018
escop

All are four-year positions (provided positive periodic evaluation), preferably starting in September or October 2018. Salary is according to standard Ghent University regulations for PhD students (starting at around €2000 per month net salary). Candidates should have a Master’s degree in Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, or similar.

1) Synchrony and coupling in procedural and declarative memory tasks

This position is situated in the framework of an inter-university project called “The journey of a memory: dynamics of learning and consolidation in maturation and ageing”, see www.eosprogramme.be.

2) Transfer of serial order information between working memory and long-term memory

This position is situated in the framework of an interuniversity project called “The journey of a memory: dynamics of learning and consolidation in maturation and ageing”, see www.eosprogramme.be

3) The role of the locus coeruleus in arousal regulation in ADHD

This project is focused on arousal regulation in ADHD. There is a long tradition of explaining ADHD in terms of arousal regulation difficulties. While many studies found support for this, little is known about its underlying neurobiological substrates. The locus coeruleus (LC), a small nucleus in the brainstem, associated with arousal regulation, is a hypothesized candidate. In the current project, we will investigate the putative role of the LC in arousal regulation deficits in ADHD, by means of fMRI, EEG, and pupil measures.

To apply, please send a CV (including two email addresses of academic referees, or referent letters) and motivation letter to Roeljan Wiersema. For further information on the project or details about the position, please also contact Roeljan Wiersema.

4) Money well spent? A multi-modal investigation of context effects during and after a reward manipulation

This project is focused on context effects of reward manipulations. Reward effects on cognitive functions have received a lot of scientific attention in the last years, usually finding that associating reward with a particular task ubiquitously improves performance. Yet, this work largely focused on transient reward effects using concurrent no-reward trials as the main comparison, and relatively little work has looked at potential costs of reward-based improvements. The present project aims at doing so by studying reward-context effects both during a reward manipulation (compared to no-reward trials from neutral task blocks) and after (most notably the “undermining effect”) to get a broader understanding of the costs and benefits of such manipulations. We will investigate the neurobiological implementation of these phenomena by using systematic behavioral testing in combination with electroencephalographic (EEG) and pupillometric measures.

Experience with EEG and pupillometry are not required but would be a great benefit, as would be a background in programming experiments and analyzing experimental data. The main supervisor is Nico Boehler and the co-supervisor is Ruth Krebs.

To apply, please send a CV (including two email addresses of academic referees) and motivation letter to Nico Boehler, whom you can also contact for further information about the project or details about the position and procedure. Applications will be considered until the position is filled.