ESCoP Summer Schools: 2010-2019

2010 ESCoP European Summer School on Computational and Mathematical Modelling of Cognition 

Organized by Stephan Lewandowsky, Klaus Oberauer and Simon Farrell.
9-19 July 2010, Mallnitz (Kärnten), Austria

Most areas of cognitive psychology have recognized the power of computational and mathematical models and have embraced their benefits to rigorous theorizing. One illustration of this trend is the growing popularity of Bayesian approaches to cognitive modelling. This powerful trend comes, however, at a cost: The complexity of models and modelling techniques render it increasingly difficult for non-experts to acquire the necessary skills and then keep pace with developments. 
This summer school is dedicated to introducing researchers to the basic techniques of computational and mathematical modelling from the ground up and in a hands-on manner.

Organizers and instructors:

  • Stephan Lewandowsky (University of Western Australia) 

  • Klaus Oberauer (University of Zurich, Switzerland) 

  • Simon Farrell (University of Bristol, U.K.) 

  • Gordon Brown (University of Warwick, U.K.) 

  • Bob French (CNRS, University of Burgundy, France) 

  • Jörg Rieskamp (University of Basel, Switzerland) 

  • Lael Schooler (Max-Planck Institute Berlin, Germany) 

  • Joachim Vandekerckhove (Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium) 

  • E. J. Wagenmakers (University of Amsterdam, Netherlands)

Website

 

2012 ESCoP Summer School on Dynamics of Consciousness 

Organized by Michał Wierzchoń
20-28 July 2012, Zakopane – Kiry, Poland

The summer school focuses on the phenomenon of consciousness as seen from a dynamic perspective. It aims to discuss the dynamics of consciousness with a group of leading scientists working on different aspects of the issue. From William James onwards, consciousness can not only be conceptualized as a static property but can also be thought of as constantly fluctuating, changing over time in terms of form and content. This variability stems from and reflects one of the most prominent qualities of our inner and outer environment – its inherent instability. Although it might pose difficulties in operationalizing and experimental measurement, the character and parameters of such change can be studied and quantified. Paralleling those in fields of attention and memory, this issue is of crucial importance to cognitive psychology as the course of research and scientific inquiry about the subject can offer both new insights into the way our mind represents reality as well as a more detailed account of the nature of consciousness.

Invited speakers:

  • Axel Cleeremans

  • Tom Froese

  • Zoltan Dienes

  • Jeroen Van Boxtel

  • Hakwan Lau

  • Rufin Vanrullen

  • Bernhard Hommel

Website

  

2014 ESCoP Summer School on Language

Organised and hosted by the Basque Center on Cognition Brain and Language.
4-19 July 2014, Donostia-San Sebastian, Spain.

The summer school was created to highlight recent advances and new challenges in language research in a wide range of topics including speech perception and production, language acquisition, bilingualism, reading, sign language, etc. and to familiarize attendees with cutting edge techniques such as fMRI, MEG, EEG, eyetracking, etc.

The School was targeted at mid-to-senior graduate students and junior postdoctoral researchers. Forty students were accepted, coming mostly from Europe (77%, including 10% from Spain), but also from America (13%) and Asia (10%).

The teachers:

  • Blair Armstrong
 (BCBL, Spain)

  • Jeffrey R. Binder
 (Medical College Of Wisconsin, USA)

  • Cesar Caballero
 (BCBL, Spain)

  • Manuel Carreiras
 (BCBL, Spain)

  • Gary S. Dell
 (University Of Illinois, USA)

  • Jon Andoni Duñabeitia

 (BCBL, Spain)

  • Karen Emmorey
 (San Diego State University, USA)

  • Gregory S. Hickok
 (University Of California, USA)

  • Emmanuel Keuleers
 (Ghent University, Belgium)

  • Judith Kroll
 (Pennsylvania State University, USA)

  • Clara Martin 
(BCBL, Spain)

  • Nicola Molinaro
 (BCBL, Spain) 

  • Monika Molnar 
(BCBL, Spain)

  • Pedro (Kepa) Paz-Alonso
 (BCBL, Spain)

  • David C. Plaut
 (Carnegie Mellon University, USA)

  • Kim Plunkett
 (Oxford University, UK)

  • Brenda Rapp
 (Johns Hopkins University, USA)

  • Arthur Samuel 

(BCBL, Spain &  USA)

  • Nuria Sebastian 
(Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain)

  • Guillaume Thierry
 (Bangor University College, UK)

The Organizing Committee:

  • 
Manuel Carreiras
(Scientific Director, Ikerbasque Research Professor, BCBL)

  • Miguel Angel Arocena
(General Manager, BCBL, Spain)

 Website

 

2016 ESCoP Summer School on Computational and Mathematical Modelling of Cognition

Organized by Stephan Lewandowsky, Klaus Oberauer, and Joachim Vandekerckhove.
10-24 July 2016, Dobbiaco (Toblach), Dolomites, Italy

Most areas of cognitive psychology have recognized the power of computational and mathematical models and have embraced their benefits to rigorous theorizing. One illustration of this trend is the growing popularity of Bayesian approaches to cognitive modelling.
This powerful trend comes, however, at a cost: The complexity of models and modelling techniques render it increasingly difficult for non-experts to acquire the necessary skills and then keep pace with developments.
This summer school is dedicated to introducing researchers to the basic techniques of computational and mathematical modelling from the ground up and in a hands-on manner. The instructors represent a broad range of expertise and are all research leaders in their field with extensive experience in teaching of modelling.

Faculty:

    • Stephan Lewandowsky (University of Bristol, UK) 
    • Klaus Oberauer (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
    • Jörg Rieskamp (University of Basel, Switzerland)
    • Gordon Brown (University of Warwick, U.K.)
    • Simon Farrell (University of Western Australia)
    • Bob French (CNRS, University of Burgundy, France)
    • Amy Criss (Syracuse University)
    • Casimir Ludwig (University of Bristol, U.K.)
    • Joachim Vandekerckhove (University of California, Irvine)
    • E. J. Wagenmakers (University of Amsterdam, Netherlands)

Website